Board

Leading Educators Welcomes Dr. Pamela Puryear of Pfizer, Inc. to Board of Directors

Dear Leading Educators team, colleagues, and friends: 

Dr. Pamela Puryear

I am so pleased to announce that Pamela Puryear, Ph.D. has agreed to join the Leading Educators Board of Directors. Dr. Puryear was recently named the Senior Vice President, Chief Talent Officer at Pfizer, Inc., and, as you’ll read below, brings a wealth of expertise to our organization.

Dr. Puryear is a business leader, thought leader, and Organization Development (OD) practice leader with over 25 years of experience including 10 years in the real estate investment advisory industry, 12 years as an external OD consultant, and six years leading OD practices in Fortune 100 companies. She has worked and consulted globally and across a number of different industry sectors including financial services, healthcare, professional services, consumer products, insurance, and education.

In her role as Senior Vice President, Chief Talent Officer at Pfizer Inc., Pam is responsible for leading strategy and implementation of programs and services that impact nearly 100,000 employees globally in the areas of talent management, learning and development, employee engagement, organization culture, diversity and inclusion, and workforce analytics.

Pam's professional passion is performance excellence, and from her diverse professional experiences, she has developed a unique perspective on what creates and sustains excellence. She has worked with individuals, teams and organizations to excel by assessing needs, and offering solutions that impact performance and productivity. With an MBA and a PhD, she considers financial and human factors and how to manage both using sound organizational management thinking and focused business metrics.

In May, 2015 Pam was profiled in SHRM's HR Magazine. In 2014 she was profiled and appeared on the cover of the February issue of Chief Learning Officer magazine and was honored to be selected as an award winner in the Business Impact category for the 2014 Learning in Practice awards sponsored by Chief Learning Officer magazine. In 2012 she was the recipient of the 2012 Rising Star Award by HR Executive magazine. She has also been recognized by the Illinois Diversity Council as a Multicultural Leader in 2014 and as one of Illinois’ Most Powerful and Influential Women in 2015.  Pam is a frequent speaker at human capital conferences.

Through LinkedIn and her personal website and blog, www.JoinDrPam.com, Pam seeks to develop a virtual community of practice to keep current on how individuals, teams and enterprises work, thrive and drive toward excellence.

Pam holds a PhD in Organizational Psychology, an MBA from Harvard Business School, and a BA in Psychology with a concentration in Organizational Behavior from Yale University.

As you can probably imagine, we are beyond ecstatic that Dr. Puryear is offering her experience, expertise, and network to our work at Leading Educators.

Regards,

Jonas Chartock

Chief Executive Officer

Leading Educators

www.leadingeducators.org

Press Release: Stuart Kaplan, Knightsbridge President, Joins Board of Leading Educators

Leading Educators is excited to welcome Stuart Kaplan to our national Board of Directors. See below for the full press release, and see the full list of board members here: http://www.leadingeducators.org/board


Stuart Kaplan, Knightsbridge President, Joins Board of Leading Educators

Brings Expertise in Retaining and Developing High-Potential Talent; Leading Educators Boosts Classroom and Student Success with Focus on Critical Mid-Level Talent

New Orleans, LA (PRWEB) October 16, 2014

Leading Educators, a national nonprofit dedicated to improving teachers’ leadership skills critical for enhancing educator retention and boosting student results, announced today that Stuart Kaplan, President of Knightsbridge USA, has joined the organization’s board. Knightsbridge is a global human capital solutions firm that integrates expertise in finding, developing, and optimizing an organization’s leadership and talent to deliver superior performance.

“Stuart Kaplan is one of the foremost experts in helping organizations develop high-performing and high-potential talent,” CEO Jonas S. Chartock said.

Leading Educators currently serves approximately 500 teacher-leaders, who lead roughly 4,000 teachers and impact a total of 115,000 students in about 200 schools is Houston, Kansas City, New Orleans and Washington, DC.

"Leading Educators achieves an exponential impact on student outcomes by training our country’s best teachers to lead their colleagues in the pursuit of student success. Only by investing in middle leaders can schools effectively support new teachers and build pipelines of future school leaders," said Jonas S. Chartock, CEO of Leading Educators. "Stuart brings an exceptional track record of helping companies achieve superior performance through a similar focus on developing talent, and we’re thrilled to benefit from his experience.”

“Great companies and great educational institutions prioritize retaining and augmenting strong mid-level talent,” said Stuart Kaplan, President of Knightsbridge USA and Leading Educators incoming board member. “Leading Educators is playing a unique role that is essential for driving real, sustainable improvement. Public schools educating lower-income students, in particular, need to continue adopting these talent development practices that have been proven time and again, not only by Leading Educators but also by the best managed companies. I look forward to working with Leading Educators to broaden its reach and impact – one public school district at a time."


Leading Educators runs a two-year Fellowship for middle leaders in schools. The program encompasses targeted training experiences, the community of a peer cohort, and the personal support of a coach in order to leverage leadership and management skills. Leading Educators also provides targeted Strategic Support Initiatives on a contract basis to districts in Denver, Houston, Washington, D.C., and New York City, and in partnership with the Academy for Urban School Leadership, and Teach for America.

Ninety-six percent of teachers who participated in the Leading Educators program are retained in the field of education. Ninety-five percent continue to serve in the region where they began their Fellowship. One hundred percent continue to serve in roles and organizations specifically focused on high-needs populations.

Reflections on Trends in Teacher Leadership

Leading Educators Advisory Board Retreat, New Orleans, February 2013

by Andrea Berkeley, Leadership Development Direct at Teaching Leaders UK and Leading Educators Advisory Board Member


Andrea Berkeley

Although the observations that follow are based mainly on UK experience, similar trends appear to be emerging across global education systems: increased public accountability in tandem with greater autonomy for schools; an urgent imperative to close the opportunity gap between affluent and poorer communities; national, public or state authority over schools being replaced by stakeholder communities or not-for-profit mission-driven organisations impatient with endemic failures of the status quo. In addition to global shifts in economic power, the nature of work itself is changing along with advances in technology.

The big question of the day seems to be whether our education systems are fit for purpose. Although successive government reforms in the UK have driven up standards overall in the last 10 years, the gap between the attainment of children from poor and affluent homes has remained roughly the same, in some areas it has widened, and there is a long tail of underachievement.

The legacy of the Charter School movement in the US - KIPP in particular - echoes through the rapid emergence of new kinds of school organisation in the UK – federations clustered around ‘Teaching Schools’ which, partnered with a university, provide professional development from initial teacher training to leadership and management across groups of schools; independent yet state-funded chains of academies and the new ‘Free Schools’.

These systemic changes afford more opportunities for collaboration and the kind of distributed leadership essential for building a self-sustaining system, where schools learn from and support each other. This ideal is easier said than done: for some sceptics the definition of ‘collaboration’ would seem to be ‘the suppression of mutual loathing in pursuit of government funding’, when faced with the reality of forced collaboration or reluctant leadership.

A McKinsey report on education standards published in the UK two years ago emphasised the importance of school leadership, citing research demonstrating that the quality of leadership is second only to classroom teaching in its impact on student achievement. The same report also published data showing that in-school variation – between subject departments and between individual teachers – is as big a driver of the opportunity gap as school-to-school variation.

Both the UK and the US have invested soundly in the development of school leadership in recent years, both as a strategic management tool and as a means of growing the leadership talent pipeline. But the focus has been mainly on senior leadership and not on those teachers who lead on the frontline of delivering improved standards.

The imperative to address the development needs of ‘first-line leaders’ – those middle ranking teachers who lead teams of teachers – was raised at an Education Summit held by Leading Educators US and Teaching Leaders UK in Washington DC in 2009. Little has been institutionalised in developed countries since then and the concept is almost virtually unknown in developing nations. Even in the UK and the US there is still a prevalence of ‘first among equals’ or ‘advocate’ culture rather than teacher-leaders who are accountable and who hold others to account.

The time for a collaborative, networked approach that includes support for individual teacher-leaders as well as advancing systemic change might just be right, as Generation Y, the ‘Me’ Generation is being replaced by the ‘C’ Generation, a psychographic group emerging on both sides of the Atlantic as highly connected, pluralistic, multi-cultural, media-savvy digital citizens with shared values and lifestyles.