Leadership

Teaching While Black and Male

Nicholas Cains is an Instructional Leadership Coach for the Empower program, Leading Educators’ partnership with Tulsa Public Schools, where he helps K-5 teacher leaders develop their strengths in instructional leadership and equity. Previously, Nick was an elementary teacher and a manager of teacher leadership development.  In light of recent reports about teacher diversity from the Education Trust and the Center for American Progress, Nick joined us for a conversation about the role of identity in his career as an educator. 

LE: Hi, Nick. Thanks for chatting with us. What’s your story?

NC: Well, it all started with a phone call! I grew up in Houston, Texas, and I went to college at Southern Methodist University in Dallas where I majored in theater, but I knew I didn’t want to be an actor. So, then I minored in journalism, but I knew I didn't want to be a journalist either. One day, I got a phone call from Teach for America, and they asked me, “Why do you like school so much?” 

I liked school because it gave me a lot.  In the fifth grade, my teacher saw something in me, and she told my mom I couldn't go to the school that was across the street for middle school. She wanted me to go to a better school even though it was 30 minutes away. My teacher did all the paperwork for my mom, and I transferred to that magnet school, and I've loved school ever since. This teacher, whose name I don’t even remember, picked me out of everybody, but it wasn’t fair. She changed my entire trajectory because she thought that I deserved a really good education, but I had 25 other classmates who also deserved one.

I started teaching second grade, and I also worked in the summer coaching other teachers. I became a manager of teacher leadership development for a couple years, and then I had the opportunity to become an instructional leadership coach at Leading Educators when we launched the Empower program in Tulsa. 

My job now is to be a human catalyst for educational development. I love helping people discover and build off their strengths. Getting to work in proximity with people who are touching the lives of children and having tough conversations about equity with people who may not have had those conversations before gets me out of bed every day. I get to bask in the glory of the people that I coach. I get to see how they shine. I'm very happy about what I get to do.

LE: Equity is important to you, and you often talk about your experiences through the lens of being a Black man.  Only 2% of teachers nationally are Black men, which is far from representative of student populations. What barriers have you experienced in your career as an educator?

NC: I think I have been luckier than most in some ways; I didn’t run into many barriers until I was already a teacher.  When I first moved to Oklahoma, there was such a big need for certified teachers that I got alternatively certified and I had the opportunity to teach in a field where I didn't have a specialized degree. 

I think a lot of people wanted me to be a teacher, especially in elementary school where there aren’t a lot of Black men. However, once I was in a school, I didn’t really have access to a mentor because of that.

A lot of people assume that just because you are a Black male teacher and you're teaching Black children that you totally understand your kids. I wish there were way more Black male teachers at my school so I could have had a more nuanced conversation about something that I already knew was true - everybody has to put in effort to learn who their kids are.

In the school where I taught where most of my kids were Black, I could not have been more different to them. I felt like I was one of very few people to them who identified as Black but who also dressed the way I dress and talked the way I talk. Especially knowing more of the history of the Black community in Tulsa now--both the accomplishments like Black Wall Street and the ways in which race was weaponized against Black excellence--I have always felt like celebrating the diversity within Blackness is just so essential.  

I wanted to be color-blind for a little bit and tell myself, “I'm just teaching my kids, it's not about race.” But it was always about race.  It would have been really nice to be able to talk to someone very early on about how they knew that, how they carry the weight of being someone's only Black male teacher in their life, and how they hold that. How do they break down stereotypes of what Black men are? I would have loved to have that kind of experience so I could give that back to my students. 

LE: Why is it important for students to have teachers in whom they can see themselves?

NC: Representation matters. Representation matters for people as we try to put together who we can be. I was in a session we facilitated this weekend in Tulsa where we talked about movies and representation, and I realized that the first time I experienced a movie where I thought that the superhero looked like me was Black Panther, and that was only a couple years ago.

When I was a kid, movies and TV shows with all Black people were usually about poverty. They were stuck on showing gangs or miseducation in schools. When I got down to that realization, which I'm still sifting through, I realized that more representations of Black people doing different jobs would have been awesome. I didn't have a Black male teacher until I was in junior high school: Mr. Boyce, who taught us government. He was awesome, but he was it. 

A majority of the nation’s public school students are students of color, but less than 20% of teachers are teachers of color — and only 2% are Black men.”
— Source: The Education Trust and Teach Plus

More representation means kids don't have to do mental gymnastics just to say, ‘I could see myself as a teacher,’ or ‘I could see myself as a superhero.’ 

When I first started teaching, I was told all the time that I would have a profound ‘additional’ impact on students because I am Black. I was also 23, and I was very afraid of that. I was like, ‘Okay, there's a lot of pressure on me being Black and perfect, and I actually don’t know if I can be a role model.’ 

After I left my first job where I had been teaching mostly Black students, one of the girls wrote me a letter that said, “Mr. Cains, you didn't know this, but I don't have a dad, and you're the closest thing I ever had to a father.”

This is one of my 6th grade girls that I only talked to every now and again at lunch time, and I never knew any of that. I realized that if you are a teacher, you automatically get power. You automatically get status in a student's life. I wish I would have accepted earlier on that it's not about saying, “I'm not ready to be a mentor.” It's more about saying, “I can't hide who I am from my students, so now that I have a responsibility, what will I do with it?”

LE: When you are working with teachers around equity, what generally gives them their biggest a-ha moment?

NC: I think that it's actually pretty consistent. I'm a big believer that to change the system, and before you even look at interpersonal relationships, there is self-awareness work that everyone has to do. I think that's the most powerful thing.

Speaking for myself, it was powerful for me to explore who I am and to be more aware of my identity. What is my race? What is my gender, what is my socioeconomic status, what is my language or country of origin, what is my immigration status, and what power do all of those give me? What unearned benefits do I get from each of my identity markers and where am I targeted?

These experiences have helped me recognize that being Black makes me feel like a target all the time, but in a room of women, being a man can give me a lot of power. That kind of nuanced conversation really pushes the envelope for a lot of teachers, because then we can act on it. I mainly coach teacher leaders who are white women and most of them teach across lines of difference as well.

When I've seen those teachers and school leaders say, “I'm really thinking about how I am racialized white, and that gives me privileges that I have to think about. I have power that I didn’t earn, but that I have to work with because it affects how I teach kids.” I think that understanding is essential, and if everyone was doing that kind of work, especially at the school level, I think it will only lead to better results for communities and for kids.

LE: What should district and school leaders be thinking about when working to bring in more teachers of color while supporting the teachers of color they already have to the best of their ability?

NC: I think first, figure out why we’re at a point where there aren’t enough teachers of color, and continue to create conditions where people of color can feel safe and seen. 

I was in a recent session where we talked about the Brown v. Board of Education decision and that while the desegregation decision was essential, hundreds of thousands of Black teachers were fired to make room for other teachers in predominantly Black schools. Historically speaking, this was set in motion a very long time ago, and not for just Black teachers.

Leaders of districts can take an honest, data-driven, historical approach to consider how we got to the point where we are. Look at exit interviews for why people have left. Was it for economic reasons? Was it conditions at schools? Was it because the way people were treated was out of line with their own values? Let's get honest about why we're here. I believe these are tough conversations that many districts are already having and are inviting their communities to have as well. 

Second, leaders could address the reality that white dominant culture is pervasive throughout the entire country. It’s the unquestioned norm. I can't speak for all people of color, but for myself, I feel safer in an environment where I'm not the only one who has to think about race, and I'm not the only one who has to attend professional development on how to bring equity into the classroom. I shouldn’t be the only one who has to reflect all the time. 

I think about race every single day of my life because I'm Black. I have had colleagues that couldn’t talk about race. They essentially said, “If you want to be okay around me, you cannot bring up race, you cannot attribute any problems to race, and if you ever try to call me in about something I've done that could have been hurtful racially, I will reject you.” That tells me there's a line in the sand between me and that person. That I would have to be open to being hurt and silenced if I chose to engage with them. That, to me, is terribly sad.

There should be systems in place to ensure everyone in the school continues to grow and really works on equity. We should all have to reflect on how we exist racially and what we should be doing in order to reduce inequity. Even in schools of primarily people of color, we can still have internalized oppression that we have not been able to talk about, aspects of white dominant culture that need to be put on the table. If we just hire a bunch of people of color into inequitable systems, we will struggle to retain them because the culture doesn’t make people feel safe enough to exist. 

I am dedicated to being involved in education for the rest of my life because I want those conditions to exist for everyone. I want every teacher to feel like they can bring their authentic self to their schools and classrooms. I want every teacher to have the resources they need to make each school a safe and exceptional place for every student to have an awesome education. I’m here now to see progress happen no matter how long that takes.

M. René Islas Joins Leading Educators as Chief External Relations Officer

CONTACT:
Adan Garcia
Associate Director of Communications
(202) 510-0827
marketing@leadingeducators.org

M. RENÉ ISLAS JOINS LEADING EDUCATORS AS CHIEF EXTERNAL RELATIONS OFFICER

Islas will oversee a strategy to expand districts’ access to supports and resources for improving teaching at scale

WASHINGTON, DC - March 26, 2019

M. René Islas, who has been a lifelong champion of expanding educational opportunities for all students, joins Leading Educators as the organization’s new Chief External Relations Officer (CERO), CEO Chong-Hao Fu announced.

The grandson of a school principal, Islas remembers learning the value of education from around the time he could talk.  “My grandfather taught me that in order for students to learn the content they need to pursue their dreams, they need strong relationships with skillful teachers who care about them and believe in the great things their students will achieve.  Throughout my career, I’ve been driven by a commitment to create the best school environments where teachers and their students will thrive,” Islas shared.

Islas has spent much of his career navigating the government, nonprofit, and consulting sectors to build coalitions of support around the issues most critical to advancing educational equity.  Most recently, he was the Executive Director of the National Association for Gifted Children where he led efforts to increase public awareness, change policies, and improve educator practice in support of advanced learners, especially the most vulnerable students who are historically underrepresented in gifted and talented programs through initiatives including the Giftedness Knows No Boundaries campaign.  Previously, he served as the Senior Vice President at Learning Forward, a nonprofit education association focused on building the capacity of leaders to establish and sustain effective professional learning, and as Chief of Staff for the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education in the U.S. Department of Education.  As CERO, Islas will lead a robust strategy to expand supports for districts and teachers to eradicate within-school equity gaps in pursuit of universal college and career readiness.             

“René brings a wealth of leadership expertise to our team, and he has helped make big things happen throughout his career to advance student outcomes by improving access to excellent educational opportunities.  Whether it was leading a coalition to create the Teacher Incentive Fund within the U.S. Department of Education by the U.S. Congress or launching thriving consulting businesses at Learning Forward and B&D Consulting, René has taken on innovative leadership challenges that have contributed to the broader education sector,” Fu shared.

“I am excited to join the powerful team at Leading Educators that is reinventing professional learning to support effective teaching for students from all backgrounds,” said Islas about the work ahead.

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About Leading Educators

Leading Educators is reinventing professional development for teachers, igniting the potential for exponential impact in schools and across districts.  We partner with states, districts, and public charter networks to design content-based learning and support structures that create the conditions for continuous improvements in teaching across their schools--helping teachers reach better, more equitable student outcomes.  www.leadingeducators.org

Kelvey Oeser Joins Leading Educators as First Chief of Networks

CONTACT:
Adan Garcia
Associate Director of Communications
(202) 510-0827
marketing@leadingeducators.org

 

KELVEY OESER JOINS LEADING EDUCATORS AS FIRST CHIEF OF NETWORKS

Oeser has led the design of teacher development opportunities for thousands of educators nationwide

AUSTIN, TX - January 28, 2019

Kelvey Oeser, who has led large scale improvements in supports for teachers over the past decade, joins Leading Educators as the organization’s first Chief of Networks this month.

Oeser brings a rich body of experience in supporting school systems to improve educational equity at scale.  Most recently, she was a Partner on the client team at TNTP where she led the redesign of the “Fast Start” teacher training approach as well as significant expansion efforts across the state of Texas.  She managed successful programmatic efforts including the Arizona Teaching Fellows program, several partnerships with large urban school districts to develop and execute district-based early career teacher training programs, and instructional improvements within Raise Your Hand Texas’s “Raising Blended Learners” districts.  As Chief of Networks, Oeser will oversee a growing portfolio of professional learning networks that currently reach four cities.           

Leading Educators partnerships aim to counter within-school opportunity gaps by providing districts and school systems with customized, multi-year approaches for scaling job-embedded professional learning.  This professional learning model equips teams of content-alike teacher leaders to plan and facilitate rigorous weekly learning grounded in quality curricula for peer teachers. The organization’s three networks currently serve approximately 67,400 students and 2,800 educators in Greater Chicago, Greater Grand Rapids, New Orleans, and Tulsa.  

“We feel fortunate to learn from Kelvey’s incredible experiences across Texas and her expertise in teacher development.  Kelvey brings so much wisdom and a fresh lens to our efforts to develop deeply contextualized options for expanding instructional learning and opportunity across districts.  We are thrilled to have her on our senior leadership team as a strategic partner, and we know she will be a critical partner to system leaders as they work to provide every child with great teaching every day,” Leading Educators President Amy Rome shared.

Throughout her career, Oeser has worked closely with a diverse community of educators to improve opportunities for student and teacher growth.  A graduate of Emory University, Loyola Marymount University, and the University of Texas at Austin, she began her career as a middle school English teacher in East Los Angeles. Later, she worked for the Texas Education Agency where she supported the launch of 35 STEM-focused high schools and managed several grant programs focused on redesigning high schools to better serve low-income communities. Then, at Teach for America, Oeser led a team of designers who created leadership and staff development opportunities for 550+ full-time instructional staff members and 800+ part-time instructional staff members serving TFA’s regions and summer institutes across the country.

“I am looking forward to taking on this new challenge of leading the strategy and implementation of Leading Educators’ programmatic partnerships with districts.  I feel so grateful for the opportunity to join an organization filled with such diverse, talented, experienced, and mission-driven leaders who are focused on achieving more equitable outcomes for students,” said Oeser about the work ahead.

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About Leading Educators

Leading Educators is reinventing professional development for teachers, igniting the potential for exponential impact in schools and across districts.  We partner with states, districts, and public charter networks to design training and support structures that improve the conditions for continuous growth across their schools--helping teachers reach better, more equitable student outcomes.  www.leadingeducators.org

A Classroom Without a Woman?

We at Leading Educators are bound by the core belief that all children deserve a high quality education. We believe that through investments in teacher leadership based on rigorous content, anti-bias education and a strong culture of learning, we can create equitable schools that yield students who are college and career ready.

Central to preparing young people for successful lives and careers is the role of the teacher. Knowing how critical teachers are to our society and to the life prospects of our students, we believe it is important to take time to recognize the historical and current role of women in cultivating and leading the future of our country. Across the world earlier this week, communities recognized International Women’s Day and participated in A Day Without A Woman - a movement encouraging women and their allies to mark the day by uniting in economic protest, wearing red, refraining from making purchases (except from small, minority or women-owned businesses) and in some cases, staying home from their jobs. Organizers sought to draw attention to the essential role of women in the workforce, as well as important policies such as equal pay and paid family leave, inciting global grassroots gains towards justice and human rights.

Teaching, like nursing, social work, and many service industries, is largely a female-dominated profession. According to 2012 statistics, nearly 76% of all teachers in this country are female; however, it is worth noting that women are drastically underrepresented in leadership roles - occupying a mere 27% of district superintendent slots.

Many of these teachers - like women across the country and across the globe - marked "A Day Without A Woman" by staying out of schools and classrooms. Some criticism was leveled against the observance, as some school districts closed in anticipation of insufficient staff to cover such significant absences. This raises a tension that is particularly relevant to our work. Leading Educators partners with some of the most underserved, high-risk student populations, and we are acutely aware of the loss of valuable learning time. We also believe that students learn a great deal by watching how adults in their lives model the values they espouse.  

At Leading Educators, equity and community are among our core values. We invest our energies in fighting systemic injustice through community engagement. With a staff that is nearly two-thirds female, the long- and short-term impact of “A Day Without a Woman” is at the forefront of our minds. In a letter to our staff, CEO Jonas Chartock said, “Whether [Leading Educators’ employees] should choose to take the day off in protest, wear red, or abstain altogether, we recognize that we would not be the organization we are without the labor and leadership of women.”

On International Women’s Day and all days, Leading Educators recognizes and appreciates the essential labor and leadership of women, and salutes their essential role in building the leaders of tomorrow.