LEAP

"A Policymaker's Playbook" Cites LEAP in DCPS Transformation

A new release from Georgetown University's FutureEd highlights Leading Educators' efforts with DC Public Schools to launch and scale LEAP (LEarning together to Advance our Practice) as one of several human capital reforms that have strengthened teacher expertise across the district.

In A Policymaker’s Playbook: Transforming Public School Teaching in the Nation’s Capital, FutureEd Director Thomas Toch examines key milestones over the past decade that have raised expectations for teacher quality and driven higher student performance.  The report highlights the challenges DCPS experienced in the roll-out of Common Core-based instructional standards, which led to the development of Cornerstones lessons.  Realizing that teachers needed more support to align their instruction to curricular shifts, the district worked with Leading Educators to define an adult learning curriculum and build LEAP as a new school-based solution. 

Since the launch in school year 2016-2017, the program has created capacity for grade-level and subject-matter teams to meet for 90 minutes each week to co-plan, examine student work and student data, and build knowledge about upcoming units.  This change in the weekly work of a teacher has shifted the locus of improvement from individual teacher to the school.  Jason Kamras, cited throughout the paper, reflects, "LEAP is a key to building teacher morale in an era of high standards.  It says, 'We get that this is hard and we want to help you.'" 

Read the full report on the  FutureEd website.

Read the full report on the FutureEd website.

Connecting Teacher Leadership and Professional Learning in D.C. Public Schools

How can we best connect teacher leadership to professional learning? What do schools sometimes get wrong - despite their best intentions - and how can we help more schools get it right? With the publication of Igniting the Learning Engine: How School Systems Accelerate Teacher Effectiveness and Student Growth Through ‘Connected Professional Learning', the nonprofit organization Education Resource Strategies highlights promising practices at four leading school systems. They offer examples of what it looks like to deeply connect professional learning to the everyday work of teachers and teacher leaders and to a coordinated, system-wide strategy for student success. They also explore how these systems organize resources like people, time, and money to make this happen.

As a national organization focused on the development of teacher leaders, we at Leading Educators are acutely aware of both the challenge and promise of connected professional learning. With regular opportunities to collaborate and deepen instructional expertise, teacher leaders can play a key role in improving student learning. At the same time, we know that teacher leaders are part of a larger connected system within schools, and their success often depends on the presence of content experts, access to high quality instructional materials, and the necessary time to work with colleagues.

Since 2012, Leading Educators has served as a key strategic partner to DC Public Schools (DCPS), one of four systems profiled in the ERS paper. At the beginning of the partnership, DCPS had just received a federal grant through the Teacher Incentive Fund to increase opportunities for teacher leadership, building on the district’s previous work on teacher evaluation and compensation. Leading Educators partnered with DCPS to provide technical assistance, drawing on our long-standing work with teacher leadership programs in New Orleans and Kansas City, Missouri.

Leading Educators worked with DCPS to launch the Teacher Leadership Innovation (TLI) program at a pilot group of seven schools. In the early years of the program, schools had great latitude in creating teacher leader roles. This meant that school leaders were highly engaged in the process but also that roles varied widely. While these roles added capacity for school leaders, they were not exclusively focused on examining student work or building teacher skills. For many teacher leaders who were new to leadership positions, coaching their former peers created challenging dynamics. Additionally, some schools struggled to protect release time that had been allocated for teacher leader functions when staff turnover occurred and emergencies arose.

As TLI expanded, structures, systems, and training were gradually put in place to address many of the lessons learned from the first cohort of schools. Over time, new teacher leader roles became more narrowly focused on what the paper refers to as “content-focused, expert-led collaboration” instead of tackling both administrative and learning functions. This ensured that principals aligned the roles to the key instructional priorities of their schools. To support TLI participants’ transition into new leadership roles, the program content focused heavily on developing both hard and soft leadership skills. DCPS also focused on helping new teacher leaders develop adult leadership skills. Leading Educators partnered with the district to provide sessions focused on relationship management, addressing topics such as difficult conversations, team dynamics, influence with and without authority, and conversations about difference. This content translated leadership best practices into normed processes and tools.

In addition, Leading Educators worked with DCPS to create systems and structures to support principals in becoming stronger distributive leaders. These included how to strongly connect school priorities to teacher leadership roles - the School Theory of Action - and how to regularly and rigorously analyze formative leadership, teacher practice, and student data - the Quarterly Data Review. Maggie Slye, the Managing Director for Leading Educators’ LEAP team, explains how these structures function in practice:

 

"The Theory of Action serves to anchor the school in its priorities, not just for students and teachers, but also anchors the leadership team in the commitments they’ve made to teachers. By establishing these priorities and commitments collaboratively, the Theory of Action supports alignment and a shared understanding of priorities. Each quarter, a Leading Educators Leadership Coach leads the leadership team to analyze student and/or teacher data to assess what has been accomplished and what may need to be revised. This data cycle - setting goals, assessing progress, and course-correcting - is something many schools do for students. It’s far less frequent to see schools doing this type of analysis for teacher goals and for leadership goals. Our schools emerge from Quarterly Data Reviews not only clearer on the next quarter’s goals for students, but also goals for teacher instructional practice and the leader actions they will take to support teacher development in those instructional practices."

 

Finally, the DCPS central office team, in partnership with school leaders, began to research, create, and share innovative scheduling approaches that would create more release time cost neutrally. With coaching, school leadership teams developed contingency plans so that they could provide sufficient time for productive collaboration even when unforeseen challenges emerged.

Leading Educators has had the honor of learning alongside outstanding DCPS school and central office leaders. Principal Art Mola from Bancroft Elementary shares:

 “It is hard to think of Bancroft and Leading Educators as a partnership. The amazing team at LE has become an intricate part of the Bancroft family in such a way that we do not view them as an external entity, rather a member of our leadership team. And as a result, Bancroft LEAP Leads continue to celebrate the amazing job our LE coach has done with each one of them, and with the whole team. I can confidently say that the quality of our Quarterly Data Reviews has improved exponentially, as we are firmly grounded in our commitment to the Theory of Action, and are already looking forward to next year as we get ready to roll out a more improved version than even now.”

These efforts laid a strong foundation for LEAP. With LEAP, DCPS is leveraging distributive leadership to improve instructional practice in content-specific and job-embedded teams. LEAP has ignited the learning engine by empowering principals and teacher leaders with the structures and tools to drive continuous improvement.

Welcome, Chancellor Wilson!

On December 20, 2016, Antwan Wilson was unanimously confirmed as the new Chancellor of DC Public Schools (DCPS). An educator for over 20 years, Wilson most recently served as the superintendent of the Oakland Unified School District where he was credited with helping to raise achievement scores in Oakland schools. Wilson is now set to take the helm at DCPS on February 1st.

Since the October departure of former Chancellor Kaya Henderson, Leading Educators, along with others in the education reform community, has followed the appointment process for a new Chancellor with great interest. Over the past four years, we have worked in close partnership with DCPS to support instructional improvement through the Learning Together to Advance Our Practice (LEAP) initiative. This district-wide programming is designed to embed high quality professional learning and leadership development opportunities into the district’s wider plan to improve the quality of teaching and learning that takes place in individual classrooms and schools. The innovation and potential impact of this district-wide approach was recently profiled in the Washington Post, underscoring the powerful culture of shared learning that is part of DCPS’ teacher leadership and instructional improvement efforts.

Under the leadership of Chancellor Wilson’s predecessor, Kaya Henderson, DCPS became the fastest improving urban school district in the country. Leading Educators is excited to build a relationship with the new DCPS leadership team in order to continue the momentum that the district has gained. As we look toward the bright future of DCPS, we are encouraged by Chancellor Wilson’s recent comments stating, “Teachers are tremendously important to the success of the students and the district.”  We look forward to continued partnership with Chancellor Wilson to build a brighter future for DCPS and all the children that it serves.   

 

Season's Greetings from Leading Educators

Dear Leading Educators Community,

As you know, this time of year is commonly referred to as the “Season of Giving,” and we are often reminded that “it is better to give than to receive,” but I have to tell you...2016 has given us some pretty amazing gifts.

This year saw the return of our Leading Educators Institute, where over 200 educators from across the country gathered for four days to grow and refine their teacher leadership practice. It saw the official launch of our LEAP programming in all 115 Washington, DC public schools - the first time we have grown our reach to an entire district. We have begun preparations to roll out our expansion to Grand Rapids, Michigan, and we closed out the year with what is perhaps the biggest gift we could hope for, an Investing in Innovation grant from the Department of Education that will allow us to begin a four-year initiative to develop teacher leaders across the greater Chicago area.

The close of 2016 also finds us overflowing with gratitude for the 814 teachers currently in our Fellowship, the 6,500 teaching colleagues whom they support, and most importantly, the more than 180,000 students that these teachers serve every day. Thanks to your interest and engagement in our work, we are one step closer to realizing our vision of “Great Schools for all students.”  You touch our lives; you touch our hearts, and we are truly grateful.

Warmest wishes to you this holiday season. We hope it brings you joy, peace, and a bright new year.

Jonas Chartock, Chief Executive Officer

#GivingTuesday

Today is #GivingTuesday, a global day to give back to nonprofit organizations that make a difference in our communities.

We know that right about now, your inbox is as stuffed as a Turducken with a half dozen hashtags: #ThanksgivingSale, #BlackFriday, #SmallBusinessSaturday #CyberMonday, and now we are coming to you with one more. 

We've had an outstanding year, what with the return of our annual Leading Educators Institute, the implementation of our LEAP program in all 115 District of Columbia public schools, and our being selected by the U.S. Department of Education for an Investing in Innovation (i3) grant to bring our teacher leadership model to the Chicago area over the next four years. But still, we thought we’d push our luck.

Leading Educators is heading a national teacher leadership movement that helps teachers develop the skills and knowledge needed to improve instruction, transform school culture, and increase student achievement. Your donation here will help us provide promising teachers who work in some of the country’s highest-need schools with the professional learning opportunities proven to increase classroom performance and move us closer to the goal that drives our every action: Great schools for all students.

Thank you for your support on behalf of the 814 teachers in our Fellowship, the 6,500 teaching colleagues that they support, and most importantly, the more than 180,000 students they serve every day.

Best regards,

Jonas S. Chartock
Chief Executive Officer

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Good Luck, Not Goodbye

Good Luck, Not Goodbye

For those with a finger on the pulse of the state of education reform in U.S., Kaya Henderson is likely a familiar name. Heading what has been perhaps one of the most closely watched districts of the last decade, Kaya Henderson has served as Chancellor of the District of Columbia’s Public Schools for an outstanding six years.  And as of Saturday, October, 1st, she has stepped down from her post.