Amy Rome Selected as First President of Leading Educators

July 16, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

CONTACT:

Communications Manager

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AMY ROME SELECTED AS FIRST PRESIDENT OF LEADING EDUCATORS

Rome brings twenty years of educational leadership to national school networks

 

NEW ORLEANS, LA - July 16, 2018

Amy Rome, who has led dramatic programmatic development and growth at Leading Educators as Vice President of Program Design and Chief Program Officer, has been named as the organization’s first President.

Over the past three years, Rome has worked closely with Leading Educators CEO Chong-Hao Fu to re-focus teacher leadership and professional development efforts on connected approaches that take curriculum, school leader support, and other key conditions into account.  This approach has helped some of the most innovative public school districts--including District of Columbia Public Schools and Tulsa Public Schools--launch system-wide support strategies that are strengthening teacher content knowledge and improving learning opportunities for underserved students.  As President, Rome will bring capacity-building partnerships to new districts and oversee direct support to hundreds of new teacher and school leaders each year.                     

CEO Chong-Hao Fu shared, “We are so excited for this next stage in our history.  Amy brings twenty years of leadership in urban school systems as a teacher, teacher developer, principal, and principal manager. She led schools in Chicago to achieve outstanding results for students, and as the leader of our program team has spurred systemic impact with our partners that will help  expand opportunity for students nationwide.”

Before joining Leading Educators, Rome served as a principal and director of principals at The Academy for Urban School Leadership.  There, she was a key figure in designing and implementing leadership development opportunities for for teams at 32 Chicago Public Schools campuses.  Rome’s work over the last three years at Leading Educators has afforded her the opportunity to collaborate with organizational and system leaders to focus on efforts to scale great teaching within systems.  Throughout her career, she has been dedicated to preparing teachers for high-need school transformation.

“I am especially thrilled about Amy’s new role as President. Amy is a true industry leader, brilliant innovator, and tireless champion for equity and education. She brings the vision and energy Leading Educators needs to achieve our audacious goals,” said Stuart Kaplan, chair of the Leading Educators Board of Directors and Director of Organization Development at Google.

Rome and Fu step into their new roles on July 16, 2018, which coincides with the start of the fourth Leading Educators Institute.

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About Leading Educators

Leading Educators is reinventing professional development for teachers, igniting the potential for exponential impact in schools and across districts.  We partner with states, districts, and public charter networks to design training and support structures that improve the conditions for continuous growth across their schools--helping teachers reach better, more equitable student outcomes.  www.leadingeducators.org

"A Policymaker's Playbook" Cites LEAP in DCPS Transformation

A new release from Georgetown University's FutureEd highlights Leading Educators' efforts with DC Public Schools to launch and scale LEAP (LEarning together to Advance our Practice) as one of several human capital reforms that have strengthened teacher expertise across the district.

In A Policymaker’s Playbook: Transforming Public School Teaching in the Nation’s Capital, FutureEd Director Thomas Toch examines key milestones over the past decade that have raised expectations for teacher quality and driven higher student performance.  The report highlights the challenges DCPS experienced in the roll-out of Common Core-based instructional standards, which led to the development of Cornerstones lessons.  Realizing that teachers needed more support to align their instruction to curricular shifts, the district worked with Leading Educators to define an adult learning curriculum and build LEAP as a new school-based solution. 

Since the launch in school year 2016-2017, the program has created capacity for grade-level and subject-matter teams to meet for 90 minutes each week to co-plan, examine student work and student data, and build knowledge about upcoming units.  This change in the weekly work of a teacher has shifted the locus of improvement from individual teacher to the school.  Jason Kamras, cited throughout the paper, reflects, "LEAP is a key to building teacher morale in an era of high standards.  It says, 'We get that this is hard and we want to help you.'" 

 Read the full report on the  FutureEd website.

Read the full report on the FutureEd website.

Leading Educators Launches Innovative Teacher Development Strategy with TPS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 5/14/18

CONTACT:

Adan Garcia

(202) 510-0827

marketing@leadingeducators.org

 

LEADING EDUCATORS LAUNCHES INNOVATIVE TEACHER DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY WITH TPS

Professional learning approach will dramatically expand supports for content mastery

 

TULSA, Okla. - May 14, 2018

Tulsa Public Schools (TPS) launched Empower, a dynamic professional learning strategy that will incorporate focused collaboration into the day-to-day work of teachers, in 10 schools this weekend.

Building on the district’s “Destination Excellence” vision of inspiring and preparing every student to love learning and achieve ambitious goals, Empower creates weekly opportunities for teams of teachers in a content area to lead collaborative learning and practice in rigorous standards and pedagogical best practices.  The program, developed in partnership with Leading Educators, stems from a central belief that schools are a critical unit of social change, and teacher leaders should be drivers of that change in pursuit of equity. In order for schools and districts to achieve equitable student outcomes, all students need to consistently experience rigorous and joyful learning and great teaching.  

Danielle Neves, the Executive Director of Teaching and Learning for TPS, shared, “Meeting our ambitious goals for students will require outstanding learning for our educators that is grounded in content and curricula, happening day-to-day and week-to-week in schools, and led by and for teachers.  Leading Educators is supporting us, but it is our work as a district, our vision, our ambitious goals for students.”

Leading Educators began planning with TPS one year ago to ensure that conditions and leadership at all levels of the district would be prepared for an effective roll-out.  The program is designed to gradually scale over a multi-year arc so support structures and planning systems become fully embedded in the district’s operations. This approach offers greater consistency and relevance relative to traditional, outside professional development options and focuses district-led work on iterative practice known to directly effect to student learning.

Leading Educators has worked with Education Resource Strategies to help school leaders align time, people, and money to schools’ priorities.  Each Empower school’s content-specific teams will experience 90 minutes of collaborative learning time within their master schedule each week - an increase of 30 minutes over previous years. TNTP supported this planning by conducting classroom walkthroughs meant to assess current instruction across the district.  

The Empower program’s first cohort of 55 educators was inducted on Saturday, May 12th in Tulsa.

“We believe we can accomplish something incredible together in Tulsa that radically changes expectations for what our teachers and students can collectively achieve when effectively supported to master strong content,” said Chong-Hao Fu, Leading Educators’ current Chief Learning Officer and incoming Chief Executive Officer.

 Photo courtesy of Tulsa Public Schools

Photo courtesy of Tulsa Public Schools

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ABOUT LEADING EDUCATORS

Leading Educators is a national nonprofit organization founded in New Orleans that seeks to improve student achievement by leveraging the positive impact of experienced teachers who take on leadership positions in their schools.  We partner with states, districts, and public charter networks to design learning systems that develop the instructional skills and content knowledge of teachers so they can reach better, more equitable student outcomes.  www.leadingeducators.org

Leading Educators Prepares for CEO Transition

After nearly eight incredible years at Leading Educators, CEO Jonas Chartock has decided to open the door to new leadership this September.

Jonas is proud of all that the Leading Educators community has accomplished, having grown from a single pilot program in New Orleans to becoming an innovative learning and systems design partner of districts in twelve geographic areas.  Under his leadership, educational equity and collaborative teacher practice have become more deeply ingrained in the programmatic approach--shifts that have helped districts reach record student growth. As a new father, Jonas is excited to spend more time with his family and pursue new opportunities tied to his deep passion for racial equity and social justice policy and activism.

We believe the team at Leading Educators is well prepared to build on ten years of collective progress, and we have chosen Chong-Hao Fu as an internal successor who brings both a deep understanding of our programs and strong relationships with leading districts to this effort.  Jonas will continue to serve as CEO through early September. We look forward to re-introducing you to Chong-Hao and our strategic plan in the coming months.

Leading Educators has always been about collective leadership.  We have worked to be a model of the distributed leadership we expect from our school partners, and our culture reflects that nimble, collaborative approach.  As we enter this next chapter of our story, we know we are about to see many decades of districts producing their best teaching and learning yet.

We thank you for your continued partnership in service of all students.

In community,

Jonas Chartock, Outgoing CEO, Leading Educators

Chong-Hao Fu, Incoming CEO, Leading Educators

Stuart Kaplan, Chair, Leading Educators Board of Directors

Jonas Chartock to Depart as CEO of Leading Educators, Chong-Hao Fu Named Successor

May 8, 2018

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

CONTACT:

Adan Garcia

(202) 510-0827

marketing@leadingeducators.org

 

JONAS CHARTOCK TO DEPART AS CEO OF LEADING EDUCATORS, CHONG-HAO FU NAMED SUCCESSOR

Move marks first leadership transition in organization’s 10-year history

 

NEW ORLEANS, LA - May 8, 2018

Jonas Chartock, who joined Leading Educators as the organization’s first CEO in December 2010, will be leaving his role this September.  

Chartock shared, “In more than seven years, we have grown from a small pilot program with aspirations to positively impact the education of every New Orleans’ student to a critical partner to pioneering school systems in twelve regions and influencing so many more.  Our experience in developing professional learning systems has deepened our understanding of what it will take to accomplish real educational equity, and I am so proud of how well-prepared this team is to enter our next chapter.”

Chong-Hao Fu, Leading Educators’ current Chief Learning Officer, has been unanimously chosen by the board of directors as Chartock’s successor.  As Chief Program Officer and Chief Learning Officer, Fu has led innovative shifts in districts’ teacher and school leader development strategies which have produced accelerated growth in student’s math and English language arts knowledge.  Fu has been with Leading Educators for six years and currently manages partnership, district consulting, development, and thought leadership efforts. Before joining Leading Educators, Fu was the founding principal of KIPP Sharpstown in Houston, TX, one of the highest performing schools in the city and one of the few fine arts schools dedicated to serving lower income students.

During the transition, Leading Educators will be launching new programs in Tulsa, Chicago, and New Orleans that will directly serve approximately 215 new teacher and school leaders.  Partnership teams worked with 730 teacher leaders nationwide in the most recent academic year, influencing 2,920 peer teachers and 73,000 K-12 students.

As a new father, Chartock is excited to spend more time with his family and pursue new opportunities tied to his deep passion for racial and education equity and social justice policy and activism.

“This organization has never been about one person or leader, and Jonas and Chong-Hao have done an incredible job of building a culture of shared progress that will only grow stronger,” said Stuart Kaplan, Board Chair at Leading Educators and Director of Organization Development at Google.

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About Leading Educators

Leading Educators is a national nonprofit organization founded in New Orleans that seeks to improve student achievement by leveraging the positive impact of experienced teachers who take on leadership positions in their schools.  We partner with states, districts, and public charter networks to design professional learning systems that develop the instructional skills and content knowledge of teachers so they can reach better, more equitable student outcomes. www.leadingeducators.org

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4 Ways To Celebrate Women Educators

It’s International Women’s Day, and we at Leading Educators are especially thankful for the generations of women educators who have changed the world by cultivating self-discovery and growth inside and beyond the classroom.  We celebrate the countless women activists—such as Mary McLeod Bethune, Malala Yousafzai, and Sylvia Mendez—who have advocated for the universal human right to education. By championing the potential in all of us, these women have been the backbone of social progress for centuries.  We challenge you to join us in honoring them today and every day through concrete actions:

  1. Prioritize women’s opportunities for professional growth.  The Department of Education estimates that there are 3.8 million public school teachers in the United States, and about 2.9 million of those teachers are women.  Prioritizing professional growth means prioritizing women's advancement. Teachers need consistent, school-based opportunities to reflect on the realities of their context and develop their skills and knowledge in collaboration with others.  At the same time, teacher leadership strategies can create more systemic entry points to leadership and influence. By building structures that position and prepare women educators to both lead others and refine their teaching, schools can grow new leaders and energize teaching and learning in every classroom.  More and better learning benefits all of us.

  2. Advocate for women—especially women of color—to have greater agency in district and school leadership positions.  While women make up more than three-quarters of the U.S. teaching force, they hold only 30 percent of school and district administration roles (Department of Education, 2016).  This imbalance contributes to larger trends of pay disparity, perceived social status, and inequitable career advancement seen in American society as a whole. Research suggests that organizations with more women in senior leadership positions are more successful (Dawson, Kersley, Natella, 2014).  Creating opportunities for women to lead is good business.

  3. Recognize the role that systemic bias plays in accomplishing or derailing change. The perspective of women leaders is critical when focusing on the most direct ways to address the opportunity gap.  We know from our work with districts that effective school transformation strategies must be grounded in what and how students learn—a capacity where women currently have the most experience and influence.  Under-representing women in decision-making roles that affect instruction unintentionally excludes valuable insights into what students and teachers need to increase student success. Even more, we know that students of color are most likely to be taught by white women, so larger systemic shifts are necessary to ensure that hiring managers recognize and counteract institutional biases that prioritize creating formal and functional opportunities for women of color to drive change.

  4. Lift up the experiences of women of color, trans women, and undocumented women. There is no single “woman’s experience,” so it’s important that those with influence recognize and honor the diversity of experiences lived by women educators.  Teaching is an inherently dynamic and demanding profession, and the reality that life is intersectional means that simply being a person comes with other layers of stressors.  From the institutional perspective, policies for pay and work-life balance have long perpetuated systemic privileges for white women, so it is important to identify within-gender disparities and advocate for solutions that take these important differences into account.  Approach your support for women educators with the same kind of intersectional equity orientation that you expect for students. In the words of Audre Lorde, “I am not free while any woman is unfree, even when her shackles are very different from my own.”

Have more ideas to add to this list? We would love to hear them at @leadingeds!

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